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bottle feeding nigerian dwarf goats

(1 customer review)

$200.00

Sex : Female

Age : 12 Weeks

Category: Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

bottle feeding nigerian dwarf goats

The Nigerian dwarf is a miniature goat from West Africa. It has been domesticated as a dairy goat and can be found throughout the world. Goats are herbivores.

 

Nigerian goat behavior and facts

 

  • Goats are browsers, eating tips of woody shrubs and trees. They often improve a pasture by removing blackberry, weedy undergrowth and ivy (even poison ivy and poison oak) that other livestock won’t eat.
  • A doe can produce up to two quarts per day of milk that is higher in butterfat (6 to 10 percent) and protein than milk from most dairy goat breeds.
  • patterned and other combinations are possible.

 

From birth to death

  • Breed: year round
  • Gestation: 145 to 153 days
  • Kids: 3 to 4, each 2 pounds at birth
  • Sexual maturity: 3 months for males; 7 to 8 months for females
  • Lifespan: 15 years

 

Vital statistics

 

  • Females: 22.5 inches at the withers; males: 23.5 inches at the withers
  • Ideal weight: 75 pounds

Status

Nigerian goats are considered rare by the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy. The U.S. Department of Agriculture has approved the Nigerian dwarf goat as a livestock dairy goat, which makes the breed eligible for youth 4H and FFA projects.

Between about 1930 and 1960 a variety of small goats of the West African Dwarf group of breeds were imported from Africa to the United States to be exhibited in zoos.[2] The Nigerian Dwarf, like the American Pygmy Goat, derives from these, but does not resemble the stocky West African Dwarf in conformation – it has been bred to have the appearance of a miniature dairy goat.[4]: 399 [5]: 35  It was at first reared as a show breed and companion animalselection was for appearance and for docility.[2] It was later found to be suitable for small-scale dairy production, and some breeding was directed towards dairy qualities.[2] A herd-book was established in 1980.[3]

Numbers grew rapidly; by 2002 there were almost 7000 head registered.[2] The breed was recognized by the American Dairy Goat Association in 2005.[5]: 33  The Nigerian Dwarf was formerly listed on the heritage breeds watchlist of the Livestock Conservancy as “recovering”,[2] but was removed from the list in 2013.[6]

In the 1990s the Nigora breed was created by cross-breeding the Nigerian Dwarf with Angora and other mohair breeds.[4]: 399 

1 review for bottle feeding nigerian dwarf goats

  1. Melinda V.

    Excellent service!!! Happy with our new goat!

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